Posts Tagged ‘orange_drinks’

A Cackle Nite Hollow

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Don’t you love anagrams? So much fun scrambling up words to make new combinations. Here are some for “Halloween Cocktails” that still fit the theme:

A Cackle Nite Hollow
Hello, A New Cocktail
Hone Well A Cocktail
A New Alcohol Tickle

 For real Halloween cocktails, whip up the Bloody Sunday punch I created last year, or try this fun layered one. Enjoy either of these at your Halloween party next weekend! I will work on more next week (“Hello, A New Cocktail”).

 Hone Well A Cocktail

Amongst the Halloween parties October 27-30 will be the first annual Seattle Cocktail Week – definitely “A New Alcohol Tickle!” There will be events at bars all over the city in celebration of cocktails. For updates, check out the event’s Facebook page. Be sure to attend the LUPEC event on Thursday, October 27 from 7-9 pm at Rob Roy. “Boobs, Booze & Beignets” will raise money for breast cancer research New Orleans-style. Good cause + good cocktails = good time!

 

Cheers, ICE

 

The Perfect Pumpkin Finale for Your Feast

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

Can’t decide whether to make a pumpkin pie or pecan pie for Thanksgiving? Bag them both and whip up this easier dessert cocktail instead.

Praline Pumpkin Pie

¾ oz vodka
½ oz praline liqueur (or substitute, see notes below)
2 ½ T pumpkin ice cream (I used Snoqualmie Pumpkin Custard)
1/8 t ginger juice (optional)
Scan pinch of salt
Scant pinch of pumpkin pie spice for garnish (optional)

Measure out softened ice cream and add it to the vodka, praline liqueur, ginger juice and salt in a mixing glass. Stir until mixture is uniform in texture. Pour into chilled cocktail glass and sprinkle pumpkin pie spice on top before serving.  Note: For the ginger juice I used the liquid in a jar of Ginger People’s grated ginger, but the drink won’t be ruined without it. You may substitute the praline liqueur with Frangelico liqueur or amaretto, but they can be stronger flavors, so start with only ¼ oz and add to taste.  Update 12/6: I noticed in a Food & Wine book that they recommend substituting praline liqueur with equal parts Frangelico and amaretto to approximate the taste. A useful option if your friend didn’t bring you back any praline liqueur from New Orleans.

Praline Pumpkin Pie: It's like three desserts and a cocktail rolled into one.

I created this one after experimenting with other pumpkin cocktail recipes (see below) that used pumpkin butter. Faced with having to make my own pumpkin puree mix or syrup, I had an “ah ha” moment and grabbed some pumpkin ice cream to create this creamy dessert drink. The ice cream has a nice spiced pumpkin taste that the praline liqueur plays off while the combination keeps both flavors in balance.  Top with whipped cream to really get your pie on. 

Other options

During my experimenting, I did find a couple of “pretty good” pumpkin drinks and discovered a nice pear vodka by Grey Goose.  Both of these drinks came from About.com’s cocktail page via the Grey Goose company (the local liquor stores have a big display right now that includes a handy sample pack of their flavored vodkas, but definitely substitute brands if you have a different one on hand).

Pumpkin Carver

1 ½ oz Grey Goose L’Orange Vodka
½ oz maple syrup (the original recipe says ¾ oz, but it was too much)
½ oz ginger liquer
1 t pumpkin butter (I used Trader Joe’s brand)
1 oz fresh lemon juice
Apple chip to garnish

Add ice and all ingredients to a cocktail shaker and shake until well chilled. Pour into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish (optional).

Pumpkin Divine

1 oz Grey Goose La Poire vodka
1 T pumpkin butter (or less)
½ oz triple sec
½ oz simple syrup
Pinch each of cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and ginger
Apple chip sprinkled with nutmeg to garnish

Add ice and all ingredients to a cocktail shaker and shake until well chilled. Pour into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish (optional).

The Pumpkin Carver Cocktail

This year I give thanks for a bounty of cocktails I’ve tried and for you Ice + Clink + Drink readers I share them with.  Happy Thanksgiving!

Cheers, ICE

 

When Orange Meets Black

Thursday, October 21st, 2010
Halloween Drink #2 of 2

Ladies and gentleman, I attempted something so breathtaking, so amazing, so essential to the art of making cocktails, that I astounded even myself… 

OK, so that was overblown – but it is an election season and therefore not out of place. The reality went like this:

  1. I saw some layered orange and black Halloween drinks online
  2. I coveted
  3. I was pretty sure I’d flub the technique and the drink.

But –surprise! – creating a layered drink was so much easier than expected. Granted, I was floating only one liquor rather than creating multiple layers (common in shots like the B-52), but I was successful nonetheless.

Most of the online recipes used orange juice and Blavod black vodka, which would make a great Screwdriver for a Halloween brunch (do those exist?). I had some Santa Cruz Mango Lemonade on hand, though, and its bright orange color was ideal. With a few extra ingredients thrown in and a black vodka float, it’s tasty and Halloween-y.  

Black + Orange

2 oz Santa Cruz Mango Lemonade beverage
½ oz limoncello liqueur
¼ oz lime juice
Dash orange bitters
1 oz black vodka to float on top

Mix together the first four ingredients in a highball with several ice cubes.  Then, turn the “bowl” of a spoon upside down and touch the tip against the side of the glass either just below or above the juice’s surface. Pour the black vodka gently over the bowl of the spoon; breaking the fall of the vodka against the spoon maintains the liquid’s surface tension and keeps the two from mixing. To ensure an even layer, move the spoon to the other side of the glass halfway through the pour.  

The black and orange layers are quite distinct, and the orange eerily shines through the ice cubes floating in black.  It all makes for great presentation; however, drinking it this way means a mouthful of straight vodka. Stir it up and you’ve got a gruesome green color that is also perfect for Halloween!

  Cheers, ICE